Photos of waterfalls because there's not enough of those in the world

Photos of waterfalls because there's not enough of those in the world

What would be better timing than crisp autumn to embark on a waterfall hunt around Tasmania?

Summer, of course.

We didn’t have the option to choose between summer and autumn so this round of waterfall chasing was only meant to be a feast for the eyes and mind, not splashing around and enjoying the purifying feeling of a nature’s greatest shower options.

Also, since I got the new and shiny camera I have to learn how to use, waterfalls were an exciting opportunity to practice everything I have read about photography. And since that consists of approximately 5 blog posts and 2 YouTube videos, there wasn’t that much to practice really.

Luckily for us, many of the Tassie waterfalls are easily reached, only 20-30min walks away from a car park. That also means very early wake-ups though as it is very easy for thousands of tourists to reach the same pristine waterfall.

First waterfall on our route was Russell Falls. As we spent the night just a 15-minutes drive away, we were the first ones at the waterfall around 8am.

 

One can continue the walk from Russell Falls to Horseshoe Falls and see surrounding views from higher up.

 View from the top of the Russell Falls, Tasmania

View from the top of the Russell Falls, Tasmania

At Horseshoe Falls I discovered that I had my camera on automatic settings and all those shutter-speed tests changing the angle with my awesome Joby tripod did not actually do anything. I had 20 photos with the exact same settings. I wouldn’t quit my day job for photography yet, only that I’ve already done it so this better work around if my writing sucks and no-one buys my book.

 Horseshoe Falls before discovering everything was on automatic settings..

Horseshoe Falls before discovering everything was on automatic settings..

Now that I was actually able to change the shutter speed and get the water to turn into a soft flow I was ecstatic – I can take photos! With custom settings!  See the results yourself:

Of course, I had to re-photograhp Russell Falls on our way back with this new magic. At this point, Richie’s patience started to crumble and I started to fear for my camera’s life so it was better to pack up and leave.

 Russell Falls with the soft water everyone likes

Russell Falls with the soft water everyone likes

Next waterfall we run into almost by accident. I had put it on our list of things to do and very conveniently it happened to be located on the curly roads to Queenstown and we needed a break. Again, shortest of short walks through a paved road and you got the Nelson waterfall to yourself.

At this point I was already almost a professional on waterfall photos and took a whole two photos when the battery ran out. Didn’t remember to bring my spares that were happily sitting in the camera bag back in the car park.

 Only presentable photo of Nelson Falls

Only presentable photo of Nelson Falls

As this trip seems to be about learning lessons, I have listed the ones for photography I discovered with waterfalls:

  • Go as early as possible
  • Bring your spare batteries
  • Check for the big red A sign that says your settings are on automatic, very hard to miss
  • Give Richie a sandwich and go alone

Looking forward for my next waterfall photo opportunities in New Zealand!