Around Mexico City, Spanish word number 2: Basura

Around Mexico City, Spanish word number 2: Basura

I never would have thought I would spend a weekend in one of the liveliest cities in the world by sleeping 9-12 hours every night. Afterwards we heard about after parties lasting until 8 am, people dancing all of the rhythms of Mexico and felt kind of old until we remember why we were so tired – spending 8 days in a desert partying every day until late and all the preparations before and after did not leave a lot of room for sleep. Both of us have been a bit sick as well, Richie more and he’s mainly running around the city looking for a trash-can to put the tissues to – thus the Spanish lesson number 2, trash = Basura.

Thus, for us Mexico City has been all about daytime exploring in a very relaxed phase. And late starts. During our second day here we were able to see Parque Mexico and La Condesa area with millions of dogs (and dog poop), avoided the rain for an hour in a café, ate tacos and a burrito from a stall making new friends and getting a free taste of La Birria- soup (tender goat meat) and cow’s stomach- soup. You can guess which was our favourite.

I also really wanted to climb on top of a hill to see the Castle Chapultepec but by the time we were there, the whole park with museums was closing. I don’t know how many kilometers we have been walking around trying to find the places, metro stops or bus stops without a prepaid internet connection and keeping your phone in your purse as much as possible. The final adventure for the day was to catch the metro to the wrong direction, luckily it was only for two stops, and then we got home to cook a “shit load of vegetables” as Richie would say. Eating tacos with mainly meat and cheese and a burger-filler stint in America truly made one crave for something green and red.

 Richie enjoying the rainy park walks

Richie enjoying the rainy park walks

auditorium

Third day, waking up from another 12 hour beauty-sleep, we opted in for an Uber to the Anthropology Museum. Most interesting displays were the Mayan and Aztec ones and albeit I enjoy looking at these amazing artifacts, about 20% of the texts were in English and you surely miss a lot of the finer details of the history. I was fascinated by small face- figures in each different culture though. Highly recommend visiting this museum!